Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities Facing Enterprise WordPress — Post Status Draft 130
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Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities Facing Enterprise WordPress — Post Status Draft 130

Sparked by Magne Ilsaas‘s ideas in The WordPress Enterprise Paradox, Tom started a Twitter thread and hosted a live discussion with Magne and others at enterprise WordPress agencies this week. Their main concern is the challenges that arise from not having a well-defined brand and market that allows “WordPress for the Enterprise” to stand out — without being ties to a particular WordPress company or host. After getting an outline of the problem as it stands today, I asked Tom what might help differentiate “Enterprise WordPress” as a collective or entire ecosystem of agencies operating within it. Can open-source values of sharing and cooperation shape a unique global identity for enterprise WordPress agencies? Is it time for an inter-agency association or “guild” to take on these challenges?

WordPress In The Long View With James Farmer— Post Status Draft 129
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WordPress In The Long View With James Farmer— Post Status Draft 129

James Farmer’s WordPress story goes all the way back to his launch of the first hosted WordPress multisite blogging platform — just a few days ahead of WordPress.com. Edublogs currently hosts millions of students’ and educators’ blogs. James talks about successes and failures, his views on Gutenberg, how he stays competitive with Squarespace, and how he thinks the WordPress business community should respond to the loss of active install growth data at WordPress.org.

Design and Development News for the Week of November 7
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Design and Development News for the Week of November 7

A new way to keep up with that fast-moving project we all rely on, PHP. • Making wordpress/wordpress-develop usable in GitHub Codespaces. • Help count WordPress contributors and sponsors • Directory Serve is our cool tool of the week — a way to serve files to and from your phone.

Learning and Pulling Together
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Learning and Pulling Together

This week was all about revisiting and continuing conversations that have special value and maybe for that reason tend to continue on with a life of their own. Tom Willmot dropped a fine Twitter thread about the challenge all enterprise WordPress agencies face. This came in response to Magne Ilsas‘ featured post here last week, The WordPress Enterprise Paradox. In a similar theme of industry peer cooperation, Eric Karkovack asks if WordPress product owners and developers can see a common interest in “voluntary standards.” Could this clean up the plugin market? James Farmer thinks the WordPress business community can do more for itself too — by sharing data. In Post Status Slack we’re learning the tricks and trials of ranking in the WordPress.org plugin repository. How about plugin telemetry? Learn from the voices of experience.

Who’s Going to Pay for All This?
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Who’s Going to Pay for All This?

Magne Ilsaas wants WordPress to be more than the pragmatic choice for enterprise clients. He wants WordPress agencies to be known for a distinct WordPress culture and mindset. Alain Schlesser, Carole Olinger, Carl Alexander, and Zach Stepek have a frank talk with Bob Dunn about the costs of not supporting WordPress contributors. Post Status members including Dave Loodts, Marius Jensen, Jeremy Ward, and Chris Reynolds discuss the looming PHP 7.4 EOL. Plus Jb Audras‘ breakdown of contributions to the WordPress 6.1 release. For your weekend reading, some news and insights from business, workplace, webtech, and govtech writers beyond the WordPress bubble.

InstaWP: A Conversation and Tour with Founder Vikas Singhal — Post Status Draft 128
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InstaWP: A Conversation and Tour with Founder Vikas Singhal — Post Status Draft 128

InstaWP is about a year old now — let’s take a tour of it and catch up with Vikas Singhal to see how he hopes it will evolve. Currently, it’s a testing, demonstration, training, and marketing tool for WordPress product owners and agencies. Next, Vikas aims for InstaWP to support a marketplace for developers and agencies launching WordPress sites. Finally, he envisions it becoming a platform of platforms — WordPress-as-a-Service for people building their own WPaaS

Active Install Charts Removed from Plugin Repo
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Active Install Charts Removed from Plugin Repo

In reaction to as-yet-unpublicized details about the abuse of active install data in the WordPress.org plugin repository, the charts displaying that data have been removed from plugin pages in a move expected to be temporary. Important (and some familiar) questions are emerging as this story unfolds: how to balance the values of openness, security, and privacy as well as cooperation and competition at WordPress.org — still the central hub for WordPress plugin businesses.

First of the Independents
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First of the Independents

Consolidation through mergers and acquisitions isn’t the only big business story in WordPress. Partnerships are increasing too. Founders investing in founders. Product companies and agencies expanding their own ecosystems. Informal partnerships to protect common interests. There are a lot of ways to grow on your own terms in WordPress.

Salary Transparency: Why Not?
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Salary Transparency: Why Not?

On the Post Status job board, like many others, most of the WordPress employers who use it don’t include salary ranges on their job listings. Should they? Piccia Neri asked them all why they do or don’t practice salary transparency. She also put the question to agencies, freelancers, the WordPress community, developers, and designers on Twitter. Find out what Piccia learned and why she thinks salary transparency should be a universal practice where it hasn’t yet become a legal obligation.

Writing is a Challenging But Needed Profession in WordPress
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Writing is a Challenging But Needed Profession in WordPress

The WordPress project, software, and community are equally important. They all play a role in ensuring growth, progress, and success. A sizeable economy of users, builders, and business owners depends on it. That’s why staying informed is vital. And so much of the reporting and learning opportunities come from unofficial sources. We need more people within the WordPress community who are interested in writing and more places to amplify their voices.

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