How to decide what should be a paid add-on

James Laws writes about what to consider when determining whether a new plugin feature should be a paid add-on or not.

At NinjaForms, they balance a number of criteria, but in the end he says it comes to a gut decision. That said, he advices to think through these questions:

  • If you want to have the best core plugin available sometimes you place revenue generating features into your core plugin.
  • If you want to have the best add-ons available you have to place features that those add-ons can extend in your core plugin.
  • If you want to make money you sometimes have to sell add-ons that people think should be a part of the core plugin.
  • If you want to make money you sometimes have to sell add-ons that only a few people will ever need. This raises the perceived value of your entire product line.
  • If you want to be successful you donโ€™t have to get it right every time. Itโ€™s better that you get it right moreย often than you get it wrong.
  • The longer youย stick it out the more likely you will get it right. Experience pays dividends.

In a related post, Pippin Williamson and Brad Touesnard talked about their business models on a recent episode of ApplyFilters. In the episode, Pippin noted his three business models:

  1. Paid only (Restrict Content Pro)
  2. Freemium with individual paid add-ons (EDD)
  3. Paid with single add-on package and free Github Access (AffiliateWP)

Pippin noted that he prefers the AffiliateWP model. As a buyer, I do as well. I like buying one package and getting everything (versus individual add-on “nickel and diming” as he put it).

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