WordPress 6.2 Schedule β€’ 2022 in Core β€’ Block Developer Year in Review β€’ New Incident Response Team
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WordPress 6.2 Schedule β€’ 2022 in Core β€’ Block Developer Year in Review β€’ New Incident Response Team

WordPress 6.2 is set to reach feature freeze on February 7 and final release on March 28. Take a look back at Core contribution stats from 2022. Read the recap of everything that happened last year that developers need to know. Meet the members of the Incident Response Team.

Annual Survey β€’ WordPress Playground β€’ Plugins/themes Categorization
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Annual Survey β€’ WordPress Playground β€’ Plugins/themes Categorization

What are the four freedoms of open source and how do they impact us? Get a look in the Celebration of the Four Freedoms of Open Source. Try out the new WordPress Playground to run WordPress in the browser. Plugin and Theme developers note the new categorizations: Canonical, Community, and Commercial.

Annual Survey β€’ State of the Word 2022 β€’ Suggest Community Summit Topics β€’ WordPress Playground (WASM)
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Annual Survey β€’ State of the Word 2022 β€’ Suggest Community Summit Topics β€’ WordPress Playground (WASM)

Tune in Thursday for Matt’s annual State of the Word address. Check out the WordPress Playground now. It brings key platform dependencies into the browser that you can embed in your own site today. Your feedback into the annual WordPress survey helps shape the project, so fill it out as soon as possible.

Annual Survey β€’ State of the Word 2022 β€’ LearnWP Site Updates β€’ Block Editor in Support Forums β€’ Dev Guide to Block Theme Course Pt2
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Annual Survey β€’ State of the Word 2022 β€’ LearnWP Site Updates β€’ Block Editor in Support Forums β€’ Dev Guide to Block Theme Course Pt2

It’s time once again to share your feedback about all things WordPress in the 2022 survey. Tune in next week to hear Matt Mullenweg during is annual address: State of the Word. When submitting issues in the WordPress forums, you’ll soon find several blocks to use in the editor. #LearnWP has site updates and a new block theme course for developers.

Annual Survey β€’ State of the Word 2022 β€’ Meetup Accessibility Overlays β€’ Multi-line Code Comments β€’ WP 3.7 – 4.0 Final Releases
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Annual Survey β€’ State of the Word 2022 β€’ Meetup Accessibility Overlays β€’ Multi-line Code Comments β€’ WP 3.7 – 4.0 Final Releases

Should code comments switch to // ? Meetup.com stops using an accessibility overlay. Final releases for WordPress 3.7 – 4.0 are now available. Tune in soon for State of the Word 2023, happening December 15 via livestream from New York City.

State of the Word 2022 β€’ Dev Blog Beta β€’ WP 3.7 – 4.0 Final Releases
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State of the Word 2022 β€’ Dev Blog Beta β€’ WP 3.7 – 4.0 Final Releases

As 2022 comes to an end, State of the Word will happen in NYC again. Apply to attend or tune in to the livestream. Check out the beta version of the WordPress Developer Blog. Still have sites on WordPress 3.7 – 4.0? It’s really time to upgrade as this will receive no further updates after December 1. It’s team rep nomination time too.

WordPress 6.1.1 β€’ Team Rep Nominations β€’ Codespaces for Contributions
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WordPress 6.1.1 β€’ Team Rep Nominations β€’ Codespaces for Contributions

Time to update, WordPress 6.1.1 is out! GitHub has made Codespaces available for 60 hours/month, and WordPress is exploring Core contribution integrations with wordpress/wordpress-develop. It’s team rep nomination time too.

Evolving Edupack: A One-Size Fits All Plugin Leads to an Accessibility Platform and Enhanced Agency Services
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Evolving Edupack: A One-Size Fits All Plugin Leads to an Accessibility Platform and Enhanced Agency Services

I now believe that a one size fits all website publishing product is not possible. Each university has its own set of requirements. The requirements vary from the placement of buttons to the type of accessibility a university mandates. In the end, universities shouldn’t sacrifice individual requirements for ease of use.

WordPress In The Long View With James Farmerβ€” Post Status Draft 129
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WordPress In The Long View With James Farmerβ€” Post Status Draft 129

James Farmer’s WordPress story goes all the way back to his launch of the first hosted WordPress multisite blogging platform β€” just a few days ahead of WordPress.com. Edublogs currently hosts millions of students’ and educators’ blogs. James talks about successes and failures, his views on Gutenberg, how he stays competitive with Squarespace, and how he thinks the WordPress business community should respond to the loss of active install growth data at WordPress.org.

Learning and Pulling Together
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Learning and Pulling Together

This week was all about revisiting and continuing conversations that have special value and maybe for that reason tend to continue on with a life of their own. Tom Willmot dropped a fine Twitter thread about the challenge all enterprise WordPress agencies face. This came in response to Magne Ilsas‘ featured post here last week, The WordPress Enterprise Paradox. In a similar theme of industry peer cooperation, Eric Karkovack asks if WordPress product owners and developers can see a common interest in “voluntary standards.” Could this clean up the plugin market? James Farmer thinks the WordPress business community can do more for itself too β€” by sharing data. In Post Status Slack we’re learning the tricks and trials of ranking in the WordPress.org plugin repository. How about plugin telemetry? Learn from the voices of experience.

What is the WordPress community capable of? A lot of good. And a few bad apples.
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What is the WordPress community capable of? A lot of good. And a few bad apples.

WordPress 6.1 is here, and it’s awesome! It takes more than a village β€” really a small city β€” to keep us moving forward. Thank a contributor β€” there are thousands of them. β€’ Thanks especially to Mika Epstein! It’s beyond brave of Mika to share what she has gone through for the Plugins Team and the whole community. No one should ever have to go through what she has. You should know her story if you don’t.

Who’s Going to Pay for All This?
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Who’s Going to Pay for All This?

Magne Ilsaas wants WordPress to be more than the pragmatic choice for enterprise clients. He wants WordPress agencies to be known for a distinct WordPress culture and mindset. Alain Schlesser, Carole Olinger, Carl Alexander, and Zach Stepek have a frank talk with Bob Dunn about the costs of not supporting WordPress contributors. Post Status members including Dave Loodts, Marius Jensen, Jeremy Ward, and Chris Reynolds discuss the looming PHP 7.4 EOL. Plus Jb Audras‘ breakdown of contributions to the WordPress 6.1 release. For your weekend reading, some news and insights from business, workplace, webtech, and govtech writers beyond the WordPress bubble.

InstaWP: A Conversation and Tour with Founder Vikas Singhal β€” Post Status Draft 128
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InstaWP: A Conversation and Tour with Founder Vikas Singhal β€” Post Status Draft 128

InstaWP is about a year old now β€” let’s take a tour of it and catch up with Vikas Singhal to see how he hopes it will evolve. Currently, it’s a testing, demonstration, training, and marketing tool for WordPress product owners and agencies. Next, Vikas aims for InstaWP to support a marketplace for developers and agencies launching WordPress sites. Finally, he envisions it becoming a platform of platforms β€” WordPress-as-a-Service for people building their own WPaaS

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