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The Magic of Cooperation Between ‘Competitors’

Years ago, my friend Josh Strebel gave a talk titled “Cooperation over Competition” and it resonated deeply with me.  In fact, some of my first and best friends in WordPress were my “competitors.” (Hey Brian and Jason!) I’m very thankful that connection, cooperation and collaboration is already happening every day here in Slack, through DMs, in public, private channels and beyond. It’s…

Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities Facing Enterprise WordPress — Post Status Draft 130
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Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities Facing Enterprise WordPress — Post Status Draft 130

Sparked by Magne Ilsaas‘s ideas in The WordPress Enterprise Paradox, Tom started a Twitter thread and hosted a live discussion with Magne and others at enterprise WordPress agencies this week. Their main concern is the challenges that arise from not having a well-defined brand and market that allows “WordPress for the Enterprise” to stand out — without being ties to a particular WordPress company or host. After getting an outline of the problem as it stands today, I asked Tom what might help differentiate “Enterprise WordPress” as a collective or entire ecosystem of agencies operating within it. Can open-source values of sharing and cooperation shape a unique global identity for enterprise WordPress agencies? Is it time for an inter-agency association or “guild” to take on these challenges?

Evolving Edupack: A One-Size Fits All Plugin Leads to an Accessibility Platform and Enhanced Agency Services
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Evolving Edupack: A One-Size Fits All Plugin Leads to an Accessibility Platform and Enhanced Agency Services

I now believe that a one size fits all website publishing product is not possible. Each university has its own set of requirements. The requirements vary from the placement of buttons to the type of accessibility a university mandates. In the end, universities shouldn’t sacrifice individual requirements for ease of use.

WordPress In The Long View With James Farmer— Post Status Draft 129
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WordPress In The Long View With James Farmer— Post Status Draft 129

James Farmer’s WordPress story goes all the way back to his launch of the first hosted WordPress multisite blogging platform — just a few days ahead of WordPress.com. Edublogs currently hosts millions of students’ and educators’ blogs. James talks about successes and failures, his views on Gutenberg, how he stays competitive with Squarespace, and how he thinks the WordPress business community should respond to the loss of active install growth data at WordPress.org.

Learning and Pulling Together
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Learning and Pulling Together

This week was all about revisiting and continuing conversations that have special value and maybe for that reason tend to continue on with a life of their own. Tom Willmot dropped a fine Twitter thread about the challenge all enterprise WordPress agencies face. This came in response to Magne Ilsas‘ featured post here last week, The WordPress Enterprise Paradox. In a similar theme of industry peer cooperation, Eric Karkovack asks if WordPress product owners and developers can see a common interest in “voluntary standards.” Could this clean up the plugin market? James Farmer thinks the WordPress business community can do more for itself too — by sharing data. In Post Status Slack we’re learning the tricks and trials of ranking in the WordPress.org plugin repository. How about plugin telemetry? Learn from the voices of experience.

Agency Owners: Let’s Talk

Agency Owners: Let’s Talk

WordPress agencies are key players in the WordPress ecosystem. They’re working on the frontlines building the Open Web with WordPress for their clients. That’s essential to sustained and vibrant growth for everyone with a stake in WordPress and Open Source. I’ve had some great conversations with our Post Status Agency Owner members in the past few…

Who’s Going to Pay for All This?
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Who’s Going to Pay for All This?

Magne Ilsaas wants WordPress to be more than the pragmatic choice for enterprise clients. He wants WordPress agencies to be known for a distinct WordPress culture and mindset. Alain Schlesser, Carole Olinger, Carl Alexander, and Zach Stepek have a frank talk with Bob Dunn about the costs of not supporting WordPress contributors. Post Status members including Dave Loodts, Marius Jensen, Jeremy Ward, and Chris Reynolds discuss the looming PHP 7.4 EOL. Plus Jb Audras‘ breakdown of contributions to the WordPress 6.1 release. For your weekend reading, some news and insights from business, workplace, webtech, and govtech writers beyond the WordPress bubble.

The WordPress Enterprise Paradox
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The WordPress Enterprise Paradox

“WordPress as a platform is putting us on the enterprise path. But what got us here is what makes us irrelevant,” says Magne Ilsaas, CEO and Founding Partner of Dekode. Magne wants to start an overdue conversation about three big risks — and opportunities — for WordPress agencies: 1) A lack of spaces for professional conversations and knowledge-sharing, including professional events, meetups, and mastermind groups catering to enterprise WordPress. 2) Successful agencies that use WordPress extensively with little or no community involvement whose work would benefit from enterprise WordPress peer networks. 3) An over-emphasis in WordPress agencies on short-term engineering solutions to the exclusion of long-term business solutions. What’s often left out is design, user experience, and most of all the capacity to play a strategic advisory role in partnership with clients.

Moving and Not Moving With the Crowd
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Moving and Not Moving With the Crowd

This week’s WordPress business highlights for Post Status: Lesley Sim is pivoting Newsletter Glue to an upmarket clientele. A discussion starter about WordPress UX. Do we need a curated plugin ecosystem, more open standards, and easy access to current expert consensus points in key knowledge areas? Time to bail out of Twitter? PayPal? Katie Keith tells her HeroPress story.

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