Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities Facing Enterprise WordPress β€” Post Status Draft 130
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Tom Willmot on the Challenges and Opportunities Facing Enterprise WordPress β€” Post Status Draft 130

Sparked by Magne Ilsaas‘s ideas in The WordPress Enterprise Paradox, Tom started a Twitter thread and hosted a live discussion with Magne and others at enterprise WordPress agencies this week. Their main concern is the challenges that arise from not having a well-defined brand and market that allows “WordPress for the Enterprise” to stand out β€” without being ties to a particular WordPress company or host. After getting an outline of the problem as it stands today, I asked Tom what might help differentiate “Enterprise WordPress” as a collective or entire ecosystem of agencies operating within it. Can open-source values of sharing and cooperation shape a unique global identity for enterprise WordPress agencies? Is it time for an inter-agency association or “guild” to take on these challenges?

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Pandemic experiences, “Are you disabled?” and the history of screen readers

Back in July, Sabina Ionescu published a lot of different responses from people in the WordPress community to questions about the impact of the pandemic on them. I missed it then, but it’s still relevant and worth reading. Some other things I’ve enjoyed but haven’t slipped into a post yet: Joanne Limburg discusses the agonizing…

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Patchstack enriches open vulnerability data with signals showing attack volume, method, and source

Back in August, Oliver Sild announced in Post Status Slack that Patchstack was opening up “additional data” to “enrich the vulnerability data” their service discloses, now “with [a] real-time IP feed of attackers who hit [Patchstack’s] virtual patches.” Virtual patches are Patchstack’s quick interventions for customers’ sites when an official patch doesn’t exist yet for…

Learning and Pulling Together
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Learning and Pulling Together

This week was all about revisiting and continuing conversations that have special value and maybe for that reason tend to continue on with a life of their own. Tom Willmot dropped a fine Twitter thread about the challenge all enterprise WordPress agencies face. This came in response to Magne Ilsas‘ featured post here last week, The WordPress Enterprise Paradox. In a similar theme of industry peer cooperation, Eric Karkovack asks if WordPress product owners and developers can see a common interest in “voluntary standards.” Could this clean up the plugin market? James Farmer thinks the WordPress business community can do more for itself too β€” by sharing data. In Post Status Slack we’re learning the tricks and trials of ranking in the WordPress.org plugin repository. How about plugin telemetry? Learn from the voices of experience.

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